Moral Absolutes

thIn The Christian Imagination, edited by Leland Ryken (Professor at Wheaton College), Francis A. Schaeffer’s essay, “Perspective on Art” is used to emphasize the premise of the book – that being to learn how to read and understand art from a Christian worldview.

In the essay, Schaeffer proposes that the Christian worldview can be divided into two themes; major and minor. Regarding the major theme and the morals therein, he says this,

Christianity gives a moral solution on the basis of the fact that God exists and has a character which is the law of the universe. There is therefore an absolute in regard to morals. It is not that there is a moral law beyond God that binds both God and man, but that God himself has a character and this character is reflected in the moral law of the universe. Thus when a person realizes his inadequacy before God and feels guilty, he has a basis not simply for the feeling but for the reality of guilt. Man’s dilemma is not just that he is finite and God is infinite, but that he is a sinner guilty before a holy God. But then he recognizes that God had given him a solution to this in the life, death, and resurrection of Christ. Man is fallen and flawed, but he is redeemable on the basis of Christ’s work. This is beautiful. This is optimism. And this optimism has a sufficient base.

Romans 1:20-21 tells us that,

…his invisible attributes, namely his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse. For although they knew God, they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him…

Everyone knows that God exists. This fact is easily notable and inherently undeniable based on God’s general revelation of himself. Even further, if God’s very character is truly reflected in the moral law of the universe, then the question of from where morals come is no longer a matter of debate – they come from God.

A standard is a standard is a standard.

When creation acts outside of the bounds of which the Creator has purposed them, rebellion ensues; destruction commences; and sin reigns. When everyone does  what they believe is right for themselves, what absolute standard – i.e. moral – are their actions being measured against? If my standard for “good conduct” is significantly lower than someone elses, I cannot be faulted for doing that I believe is right for me – even if I sin against that person! However, God has already set the “measuring stick” by which our actions are compared – His Word.

A non-believer may disagree with that statement. Even a believer who is fairly liberal in their views may not fully stand in agreement. However, their standing has no merit because the Bible has already told us about those who do not honor God, even though they know him. Bear in mind, honoring God involves more than a profession of faith with your mouth. Are you also honoring God with your hands and feet?

We’ve failed to live up to God’s moral standard (Gen 3). The cross was our way back to be reconciled into relationship with Him, thereby, once again, providing us the example of a moral standard in Christ. Christ’s work on the cross is forever.

There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, grounds for someone to rightfully claim that there are no moral absolutes. God, by nature, is moral. God, himself, is absolute. And above all else, God alone is perfect and requires no example of morality. We do.

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4 thoughts on “Moral Absolutes”

  1. Yes and amen ,,for we are the salt of the world today again with showing godliness in our social life with without sin and hate and no the wicked life, but peace and harmony and hope we will share today In Jesus name thanks and bless,keijo sweden

    1. Thank you for taking time to read, Keijo…and all the way from Sweden. Praise God for brothers and sisters there. May our God continue to be with you and yours. Grace and Peace.

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